Latin Flavours Magazine Melbourne | Reviews
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Reviews

Sometimes the best restaurants are the hardest to find but we have found them.

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A craving for home

Entrepreneurs start restaurants for a variety of motives. A passion for the food. A more calculating assessment of potential financial return. In the case of Lilian Funes de Murga the reason was simple. Nobody was cooking the cuisine from her native El Salvador....

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A magical food tour

An evening at Tapachula restaurant in North Melbourne is food tourism at its best. The Venezuelan chef Americo Serritrello, who hails from a family of chefs, creates dishes with influences from the diverse cuisines of South America, Central America and the Caribbean....

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Earthiness and flavour

South American food can be surprising to Australian palettes so one way for customers to explore the different options is to have small serves. That is the philosophy of Daysie Goldenberg, proprietor of the Santa Ana restaurant in Acland Street, Fitzroy. She offers what she describes as “Latin American tapas”: a variety of small dishes from different parts of South and Central America....

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Kanela Flamenco Tapas Bar

This is food that is based on the home cooking style so beloved in Spain. The restaurant, which reached its tenth year in January, is one of the most established traditional Spanish restaurants in town. The chef is Conchita and her husband Nick does much of the managing. The Flamenco performers are the sons, and daughter Raquel operates the restaurant and bar....

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Los Latinos

Entrepreneurs start restaurants for a variety of motives. A passion for the food. A more calculating assessment of potential financial return. In the case of Lilian Funes de Murga the reason was simple. Nobody was cooking the cuisine from her native El Salvador. “I couldn’t find the food here and I had a craving for our home food,” says Lilian. “I was making it myself and I thought ‘How many people would want to have Central American food?’”...

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Lulos’ Imaginative Combinations

This is sophisticated food, a creative blend of Spanish and South American flavours, a blend of the European old world and the new world. As maitre de Corban Hill says, the South American tapas’ are “definitely not authentic” but they “used licence to create modern flavours.” The result is often delicious, always intriguing....

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Of Tarantino And Spicy Flavours

When Christian Silva was devising the look of his restaurant in the Victoria Market, La Cantina, he went to an unusual source of inspiration. Quentin Tarantino films and Spaghetti Westerns. He says his favourite Tarantino films are True Romance and Django Unchained. “I wanted to create a feel where you come here and you feel you are in another country,” he says....

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Rich, complex and balanced

The cliché is that Mexican food is hot, with chiles and blazing sauces. But to think that this is all it is about is partially to miss the point. The philosophy of Mexican food differs from much European cuisine. Instead of starting with a small range of flavours that are expanded out, the method is to begin with a startlingly wide span of tastes and to combine them in such a way that they become a balanced offering....

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Tradition, tango, taste

Restaurants typically navigate a course between the familiar and the novel. Many variants are possible. Some use the familiar traditions of the home, others try to create new taste combinations that surprise and delight. Buenos Aires restaurant in Lygon Street Carlton very much adopts the traditional approach. The opening fare is bruchetta: beef vinagreta on sour dough bread with diced tomatoes and fresh basil. This is followed by deliciously chewy empanadas (small pasties with egg, beef and an olive). The accompanying chimichurri (a meat sauce with olive oil and parsley or coriander) is fresh and delicate....